Jan 8, 2019

Computer Programmer Classes

It's no secret that tech jobs offer potentially lucrative career paths for those with the right skills, including people who didn't take the traditional route of going to college before starting work. However, if you don't currently know how to code, you'll need to take some computer programmer classes or teach yourself to code for free. This advice should make it easier to decide what the right educational option is for your needs and personality.

What You Should Know About Programming Classes

Learning computer programming at home requires some crucial decision making about the route you take. You can always reverse your decision and take a different path, but you'll have lost valuable time in doing so. That's why it's important to know what you're in for before learning computer coding.

Complete beginners who want to take an Intro to Programming course or something along those lines should be aware that they're likely to come up against some difficult challenges at some point in the process. While coding doesn't usually require you to be good at math, it does require you to be willing to confront technical topics head on. The language used to describe these topics and concepts can be confusing at times, even without the addition of any actual coding languages. Tech is a highly complex and specialized field, and that means the people who describe it need to use specific language that may sound foreign to you even though it's all in English.

The fact that language can occasionally be confusing means that if you have any tendency at all to get apprehensive about your abilities, you may want to seek out an education that offers a bit more support and opportunities for coaching than what you get from a free code academy setup without instructor support. Even if you're up for a challenge, you may find yourself frustrated at points in the process of learning to code.

Other Factors to Consider

Although it can be tough to learn how to code, the experience of completing a project and knowing that you did it right can be incredibly rewarding. That's part of the reason why taking a formal class, like a Udacity Nanodegree program, can be beneficial. Education that's structured around classes with specific project goals that reinforce what you've learned and show off your new skills is great for helping students feel confident that they're getting it right. Beyond that, though, it can be a good way to build a portfolio to use in your job search.

If you're starting to learn to code as a complete beginner, you may also want to make sure you know what the expected knowledge level is for the class or computer program tutorials you're going to take. Prerequisite knowledge and skills should be spelled out clearly so you don't end up getting in over your head. Making sure you're at the right level for your current skills can make it less likely that you might end up getting frustrated or feeling lost in a lesson.

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/classes/2015/08/what_coding_class_should_i_take_programming_is_like_learning_a_new_language.html

https://cseweb.ucsd.edu/classes/wi09/cse8b/StudentAdvice.pdf

https://qz.com/work/1367191/apple-ibm-and-google-dont-require-a-college-degree/"